Modern Naval – the Aircraft

A small piece of the lead pile

A small piece of the lead pile

As the next cab off the rank here in Thomo’s Manila Hole, and given that I have finished the repairs on the three modern fleets, I thought I would finish off the aircraft. Yes, they don’t look much like an air force or three at the moment but they will form the basis of the aircraft for the Indian, Chinese and Japanese Naval forces. So, what is being used? The aircraft are 1/1250th scale and a combination of Cap Aero and 617 Squadron, from Magister Militum. This scale was originally made I guess to provide aircraft for the 1/1250th scale ship collections as some of the aircraft in the ranges are carrier born aircraft with wings folded.

Anyway, in the collection are the following.

For the Indians:

  • Il-38 May
  • Tu-142 Bear
  • MiG-29K Fulcrum
  • Westland Sea King
  • Ka-27 Helix masquerading as Ka-28 and/or Ka-31
  • Sea Harrier
  • BR.1050 Alize

For the Chinese:

  • Tu-26 Badger
  • MiG-21 Fishbed masquerading as Chengdu J-7
  • Su-34 Flanker masquerading as Shenyang J-15
  • Su-30 Flanker
  • Ka-27 Helix masquerading as Ka-28 and/or Ka-31

And lastly, for the Japanese:

  • P-2H Neptune masquerading as a Kawasaki P-2J
  • F-16 Falcon masquerading as Mitsubishi F-2
  • Sikorsky Sea Hawk masquerading as Mitsubishi H-60
  • Sikorsky Super Stallion
  • F4 Phantom

And then to round all that out is a packet of mixed missiles. Of course, at 1/1250th scale and with my ailing eyes, one missiles is going to look like another.

Having looked at the models and started to prepare for the mounting I must admit that the Cap Aero are superior to the 617 Squadron models.The 617 models are fine in and of themselves, it’s just that the Cap Aero are a little finer – wings, tail planes and what detail there is is cleaner. I would recommend both ranges however, but I would recommend Cap Aero ahead of 617 Squadron. Just my opinion mind.

Next step, stick a brass pole into them and set the bases up.

First Batch of Repairs

The damaged aircraft


The damaged aircraft

As I finally had a painting area set up I thought I would start repairing the Balikbayan Box damage – the damage after the move from Singapore to Manila. The 1/1250 scale aircraft were the first cab off the rank.

The damaged aircraft were an Indian Naval Air Force Il-38 May and a Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy Aircraft Tu-26 Badger. The Il-38 had developed a really weird dihederal during transport.

So, dihederal corrected and a touch of super glue Gel and the aircraft are as good as new.

What is a little more interesting at the moment are the coins.

The aircraft, repaired and in the air again

The aircraft, repaired and in the air again

There is a collection of 10 and 25 piso coins on the table as well. These are reasonably new here from what I can determine and whilst the 25 piso one looks brass and the 10 piso coin looks copper, both are magnetic.

I noticed the same thing in Singapore with the new coins there, Regardless of the silver appearance, they were also magnetic. I’m starting to wonder now either what the metal is they are made of or what is added to the coin to give it the magnetic features.

The reason I have the coins is that I am thinking of attaching them to the underside of the aircraft bases to give them a little more stability. Anyway, first repairs complete! :-)

The coins are adhering to the magnet under the base

The coins are adhering to the magnet under the base

Back at the Painting Table … Finally!

The bits!

The bits!

I finally got a computer table which will serve as a computer table and a painting desk. A trip to one of the local model shops on Friday evening resulted in me having something to do as a small project. I got something to build. A drill, for models, with small chucks to take, er, small drills.

Now I will freely admit that this is only likely to be of great use when I am working in plastics although it may spin up with enough torque to drive a bit through the soft metal of wargame figures … ans ships.

Hmm!

The finished drill - on the painting table photographed darkly!

The finished drill – on the painting table photographed darkly!

This leads nicely into projects for the coming year. Now, as I have a drill, what can I drill. 2015 is the next year. One hundred years ago it was 1915 and that just leaves me one more year to wait for the centenary anniversary of the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrakschlacht) on 31 May and 1 June 1916. I have two fleets at mother’s, the High Seas Fleet and the Grand Fleet in 1/3000th scale. Almost all those ships will require masts of some form or another. This is starting to look like a plan. Brass wire, a small electric drill and 200+ World War I ships.

Best of all, it stops me becoming lost in 1/72 scale plastic figures and tanks ;-)

Some Toys

One of the advantages of having regular employment again is being able to afford to buy some toys. I stopped into the Tamiya shop here in Glorietta tonight looking for a couple of kits. I found them … and I should point out that the car kits are not mine … madam has decided to build one to determine if it is a suitable present for her nephew … I knew there was a reason I liked this woman ;-)

image

The loot from tonight's toy shopping

An Academic Wargames Survey

A mate of mine in sunny, down-town Kuala Lumpur (you know, in Malaysia where the Islamic Authorities get all upset over people petting pooches) is finishing his university study and he is running a survey as part of his final assignment.

If you can spare 10 minutes or so of your time to hep Ian out by filling in his survey, The Relationship of Consumer Personality Trait and Brand Loyalty: An Empirical Study of Tabletop Miniature War-Gaming, then please go to this link and complete it.

Ian is one of those old school wargaming types – will try anything once, sometimes twice, so help out a mate (and not just because he has such a cool name ;-) )

Thomo’s Manila Hole – 2

Yes, it is a bit of a mess but come Wednesday night, all will be well

Yes, it is a bit of a mess but come Wednesday night, all will be well

Back on 19 September 2014 I published Thomo’s Manila Hole which was a look at where Thomo’s Hole would be. Having been, as the actors say, “between engagements for the better part of the first six months of 2014, the next steps to getting Thomo’s Hole set up were held in abeyance, waiting the first full salary payment.

I received the first full salary payment.

So, it was off to SM Department Store (SM = San Miguel – yes, the same folks as the beer folks) and after a quick look, a suitable book/display case was located and purchased along with a computer table. The computer table will be the painting table eventually. I organised for is all to be delivered on Monday – yesterday.

I got home last night and nothing had been delivered so I thought “oh well, I’ll call them and yell at them tomorrow”.

At around 10:30 pm however I received a phone call letting me know that the delivery was on the way. It arrived about 10 minutes later. The best thing was that apart from getting the delivery on Monday as requested, the flat pack computer table was assembled before delivery.

The next photo of the Hole will be after everything has been put away!

Bloody Stupid Processing

thomo_the_lostFaceBook are guilty of it. So is the Asia Wargaming Net. I went to register tonight and guess what? My handle, one I have used for nearly 20 years now, “Thomo the Lost” is unavailable Why is it unavailable? Because useless lazy programmers who haven’t got a brain in their heads think the string “homo” is somehow dirty, or worse, there even lazier team leaders and managers have just accepted some file of potentially dodgy names without considering what they are trying do!

Of course, the truly ridiculous thing is that I can set an in game name that is considerably worse – as in the two of the examples below (don’t read mother, there is a very naughty one there).

shag

threefuk
In fact, if I replace a “c” with a “k” I can make a much worse combination of letters and that is also accepted!

Idiots!

Hey Osprey Publishing, there are other tablets other than iPads

As many of you will know, I get annoyed with magazines that I subscribe to and that insist on locking me into one technical eco-system or other. Osprey publishing has joined that group.

They have recently been promoting their World War II Military History Magazine. This magazine looks good, slick and in the quality we come to expect from Osprey. They have even offered a free PDF download so one can have a look at the magazine. The magazine itself contains one complete e-book from the Osprey range and near as I can work out, subscribing gives you complete access to all the back issues.

To be fair to Osprey, they publish their eBooks in PDF and ePub format.

Which now begs the question … why, of why, is the magazine only avaiable through the iTunes store. It is advertised as

available for iPad and iPhone, and subscriptions can be purchased for just £2.99 per month or £7.99 per quarter. Each issue is a real gem, so why not give it a try and unlock a world of fabulous material on the Second World War.

OK, earlier in their advertisement they note that each

issue includes a full Osprey series eBook, and is packed full of fascinating extra material from our archives and authors

Hey Osprey – there are other tablets out there other than iPads. In fact, iPads account for 39% of the total international tablet market. Android tablets account for 61% currently! So what possesses a company to cut off 2/3rds of its potential market?

Why don’t you make all issues of the magazine downloadable PDFs so folks can move it from one platform to another, in the same way I can move my Osprey eBooks? You can still offer it through iTunes (and as a PDF, through Play Store as well as the Windows 8 Marketplace. Why cut off  67% of your potential market?

Thomo’s Hole Back on the Air

There was a slight downtime in the last 24 hours brought about by the registration of the domain pointer for thomo.coldie.net expiring coupled with HSBC bank refusing the $13.00 online payment I made from the Philippines, even though there was $500 in my account AND I had been making payments from the Philippines over the previous two weeks.

Boo Hiss HSBC.

Last night I had intended on renewing the domain name, using madam’s POSB Debit Card (Yay for POSB – better service levels than HSBC) however several beers and a Murphy’s Gutbuster breakfast for dinner along with a cafe latte from Starbucks on the way home ensured that as I settled on to the couch for 10 minutes before going to my PC I would not wake again until about 4:30 this morning when it was time to switch off the TV (there was nothing on anyway) and roll over and return to blissful, beer induced slumber.

This morning I tried the renewal again – still failed on HSBC (boo) but paid first time with POSB. Isn’t it illegal for a bank to prevent us from accessing our own money?

Anyway, Thomo’s Hole is back, I swam for the first time in  months this morning (oh the agony), weight loss has steadied from its initial move south and no beer is contemplated until … well … next weekend … perhaps!

First Box Unpacked – not too much damage

I lifted the lid

I lifted the lid

I thought I would do myself a favour and unpack the figures that I figured would travel best – the modern ships. These are all on magnetic bases in a metal tin and I figured that the bubble wrap would help to stop them moving around. Now I should mention that I was not expecting anything great as I was present when the guys taping up the Balikbayan boxes taped first the top, then inverted the boxes to tape the bottom.

Opening the Balikbayan boxes and taking out the boxes of figures was not too trying a task as the boxes they were packed in had not collapsed at all (and remember, each of the 7 Balikbayan boxes had about 50kgs of stuff in them … books, clothes, shoes, electronic stuff and so on.

I removed the bubble-wrap and saw ...

I removed the bubble-wrap and saw …

I lifted the lid and things looked pretty much OK. the bubble wrap had kind of scrunched up a little bit and there were a couple of ships on their side down below but overall, it didn’t look too bad.

I removed the bubble wrap.

Yep, things had moved around a bit inside and I could see a little damage to the two aircraft but still, overall, everything looked pretty good.

I sorted the vessels out and reorganised the fleets in the box.

They are looking fine and ready for action (and I must admit, having not seen these for a couple of months, I do like the new style of basing I did on the Japanese).

All sorted by Navy again (Indian, Chinese and Japanese)

All sorted by Navy again (Indian, Chinese and Japanese)

The only damage that I could see was to the aircraft.

Mind you, the thing that has me amazed with the aircraft is that one of them has ended up with a lot more dihedral than it stared with. It must have been stretched over a vessel somewhere.

The only fleet damage was to the aircraft

The only fleet damage was to the aircraft

So, tonight, it’s out with the super glue (now where did I put that), straighten the wing dihedral and re-glue them to their poles.

Next box tomorrow (or maybe Monday of I go Karaoke tonight)!