A Self Indulgence – the Wargaming Tasks for 2017

Last weekend I had the time to indulge myself in my fantasy – the painting queue for 2017. I had originally thought it was not that extensive as I had not purchased all that much in the way of new lead in 2016 and besides, I did not have too much left over for painting from 2014 and 2015.

The painting queue follows in not particular order!

World War II Aerial Combat. The aircraft mix in these packets are from Raiden Miniatures and are in 1/285th scale. They are:

  • Russian
    • 6 x Tupolev SB-3
    • 6 x I-16 ‘Rata’
  • Finnish
    • 4 x Fiat G.50
    • 4 x Fokker D.XXI
    • 4 x Brewster Buffalo

Russian/Finnish WW2 Aircraft
The rules are Raiden Miniatures Fast Play Aerial Combat Rules. I have version 1.1.

Any of the World War II aerial combat rules could be used. The beauty with the Winter War is that a mix of aircraft seldom seen on the wargames table is possible with the Finns using equipment from Italy, the Netherlands and the USA, among others.

Raiden also make a US WW2 aircraft carrier flight deck, the USS Enterprise, for flight and combat operations. It is a kit in 51 parts and I am not sure if it is made or not currently. See http://www.raidenminiatures.co.uk/4.html for details.

Thunderbolt and Lightning Air Combat Rules
Thunderbolt and Lightning Air Combat Rules
Starmada vessels from Brigade Models. In this case, the PacFed fleet. I have a PacFed Future War Commander Army tucked away up here and this is the off-planet version of those. The PacFed are loosely based around a “Pacific Federation” and contain a lot of vessels with Australian type names.

PacFed Starship Fleet
PacFed Starship Fleet
As an opponent to the PacFed I looked to ONESS – loosely based around German forces. Somewhere at mum’s I have the ground fleet to complement this. This also is from Brigade Models.

20170112_225409
The ONESS Starmada Fleet
Baccus 6mm figures make up the rest of my Singapore DBA Project. Armies still to be painted are:

  • II/9a Syracusan in Sicily 410-210BC
  • II/8 Campanian, Apulian, Lucanian and Bruttian 420-203BC
  • 11/39a Iberian 240-20BC
  • II/11 Gallic 400-50BC
  • II/32a Later Carthaginian 275-202BC

The 6mm Ancients
The 6mm Ancients
Speaking of Brigade Models, I acquired a US Aeronef fleet. This was for part of the Peshawar project but with the purchase of Imperial Skies, the project has expanded somewhat (see below for how much). Of course what is illustrated and discussed here does not mention the British, French and Prussian Aeronefs that are already in the collection.

These then are the US Aeronef fleet. Quite a tidy force. I have been trying to think of an alternative paint scheme other that the Great White Fleet colours of, well, white!

US Aeronefs
US Aeronefs
The perfect opponent for the Americans above – the forces of the Rising Sun. Both Fleets (the US and Japanese) are substantial and would be the two most powerful fleets in the collection.

As with the Americans I am trying to think of a colour scheme that is not the Japanese naval vessels at Tsushima!

Japanese Aeronefs
Japanese Aeronefs
I wanted a bit of fun so I added a Scandinavian Union fleet. Dumpy vessels certainly but they have a certain attraction as well. These are also from Brigade Models and I am pondering colour schemes for them.

These were never envisaged for the Peshawar Project however they will make a good opponent for the BENELUX forces described below.

Scandinavian Union
Scandinavian Union
For a little South American Aeronef action I picked up some Argentinians. These look sufficiently different to other ‘nefs to keep the interest up.

Rather than a standard grey or Victorian Livery for these I have been toying with the idea of basing a paint scheme around light blue and white – same colour as the shirts of the Pumas. Again, Brigade Models.

Argentinian Aeronefs
Argentinian Aeronefs
And if the Argentinians are light blue and white then the Brazilians should be both hairless and based around green and gold colours. I have an idea for that with an antique style of gold colouring.

Brazilian Aeronefs
Brazilian Aeronefs
An opponent for the Scandinavian Union, and possibly the Italians. The Benelux Aeronef fleet consists of vessels from Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Benelux Aeronefs
Benelux Aeronefs
The above-mentioned Italian Aeronefs.

Italian Aeronefs
Italian Aeronefs
The last of the Aeronefs in this years paint queue, the Russians. They are also one of the protagonists in the Peshawar campaign. For colours on these I am thinking, maybe, something like Port Arthur 1905.

Russian Aeronefs
Russian Aeronefs
A couple of years ago I picked up two armies for the Great Pacific War. Here are the Chilean/Peruvian Army and the Bolivian forces. I am planning on using these with the 1859, 1866 or 1870 rules. A project that has been on the back-burner for three years now.

10mm Chilean/Peruvian and Bolivian forces
10mm Chilean/Peruvian and Bolivian forces
I have had an interest in both the English Civil War and the 30 Years War for many years and picking up Baccus 6mm‘s English Civil War boxed set seemed like a good way of getting into it. The set gives me two armies, a couple of houses, Polemos rules and 60mm bases.

I am planning on using these with the Baroque Rules from Dadi and Piombo as well.

ECW - Polemos and Baroque
ECW – Polemos and Baroque
Navwar 1/3000 scale World War I Austrian ships – battleships to destroyers/torpedo boats. I have their main opponent, the Italian fleet, painted and here already. It must be said that during the war, both the Italian Royal Navy and the Austro-Hungarian Navy kept their most modern capital ships inside their bases (Pola and Kotor for the Austrian Fleet, Brindisi and Taranto for the Italian fleet), leaving mostly submarines, destroyers, torpedo boats and scout cruisers to do any fighting.

World War 1 Austrian Fleet
World War 1 Austrian Fleet
Heroics and Ros figures have been used for my Cold War Poles – an opponent for my Cold War Danes.

Cold War Commander Poles
Cold War Commander Poles

In addition to all that, there are a few other items on the list including:

  • Anthony’s 20mm World War II British
  • Finish off the 1/285 scale World War II Japanese
  • 1/285 scale World War II Hungarians
  • 1/300 scale Cold War Commander Danes to be completed
  • 1/1200 scale Coastal Warfare Ships
  • The 1/3000 scale Jutland Fleets
  • Houston Ships Italians and Austrians from the Battle of Lissa
  • Dystopian Wars fleets, and
  • Peshawar, 2mm ground forces

So – a painting queue that for 2017 should keep me busy well into 2020!

23 April 2017 – Update: Nothing. Nada. Not done a thing! Maybe I need to motivate myself and buy some more figures.

Naval Battle of Abtao – 7 February 1866

PaqueteMauleOh dear, lunchtime reading strikes again. Looking for some quick light reading over lunch I thought to myself that it was time for a little more research into the Guerra del Pacífico, that project I have had on the back burner for a while ((and which interestingly is driving me crazy as I cannot find the 10mm figures I had purchased for it)).

Up popped the Naval Battle of Abtao.

By the time of this battle, Chile and Peru were in alliance (which also included Ecuador and Bolivia) against Spain. Argentina and Brazil did not join the alliance, partly because they were busy fighting with Paraguay.

Spain had sent Admiral Mendez Núñez to South America and he decided to send two of his most powerful ships south to destroy the combined Chilean-Peruvian fleet. The Chilean-Peruvian squadron was under the command of Peruvian Captain Manuel Villar and had taken refuge at Abtao, a well protected inlet near the gulf of Chiloé in southern Chile.

The Spanish squadron appeared at the entrance of the inlet on 7 February 1866 but decided not to enter as they did not want to risk their ironclads running aground in the shallows. A cannonade lasting several hours was exchanged with little effect.

The Chilean-Peruvian squadron was at anchor and without steam (and it takes a long time to run steam up). Some of the vessels engines were also being overhauled so definitely the Spanish had the Allied fleet in a good position. Had the Spanish been a little less timid they may have won a good victory. However, in spite of the disadvantages, the Allied squadron mounted an energetic fight. The Covadonga, under the command of Lieutenant Manuel Thomson, managed to fire over an island and scored several hits on the frigate Blanca. The battle ended indecisively without further developments.

At this point the Spanish withdrew as the long range gun duel was not going to effectively damage anybody.

The Esmeralda was not at the anchorage on the day of the battle. The commodore had sailed to Ancud for coaling.

The Spanish squadron however managed to capture the Chilean steamboat Paquete del Maule (pictured above) which was transporting sailors to crew the new Peruvian ironclads Huáscar and Independencia.

More on the Guerra del Pacífico and the Guerra Hispano-Peruana/Guerra Hispano-Chilena later.

Decisions Still Pending

Yep – wargamer’s paralysis!

With several kilograms of unpainted lead waiting in the man cave, I am still unable to decide what to do next. I looked further at the modern naval and even prepared an order for a Chinese and an Indian modern fleet along with the addition of a carrier or two for each and some aircraft models. I then duly faxed the order to Navwar only to have the fax machine fail to deliver (Navwar has the  most archaic ordering process and to be honest, the best way to order is to send them a letter ((actually, I am about to post that failed fax – I’ll report on the turnaround time in the future here in the Hole)).

Last night I received another batch of 2mm buildings from Brigade Models to use with the aeronefs and land ironclads. I am still trying to think about how to use them effectively. Mind you, I am fairly sure that I want to do something with them, so sure that I ordered some more 2mm terrain from Irregular Miniatures on Tuesday. Ian Kay of Irregular let me know that they were put in the post yesterday so I expect to see them here in Singapore by the middle of next week.

Whilst considering possible projects, I have been thinking about another 15mm DBMM army or two, especially as I really liked the look of the Khurasan Miniatures I have seen. I even considered some of the earlier American types from his ranges. It then occurred to me that as I was sitting in Asia, why not do an Asian army – say Cham; or Thai; or Vietnamese; or Indonesian; or Malay. Interestingly, I noted that Irregular Miniatures made Cham and as I had never tried painting any of his 15mm figures before, I thought I would give that a go. I therefore calculated a DBA Army for the Cham and ordered the figures off Irregular. They sell their figures individually which was nice – nothing left over from that for the spares box.

I even called up Paradigm Inifitum here the other day to see whether they had sold all the Plastic Soldier Company 15mm boxes that were not moving at the warehouse sale – let’s just say we are negotiating. Anthony has 20mm though so I am still really undecided about scale for World War 2.

Now, I reckon I have about a month or two of basing to finish the Union ACW army, so I guess the ideas are going to change about another dozen times before I finish the bases and can move on to the next project. Someone get me some sunglasses so I can no longer see the new bright shiny wargame figures

What’s Next?

I hear you say.

After a stressful week or two where I have not painted (probably adding to my stress), I have, however, in the quieter moments been considering the next wargame project ((other than completing the basing on the ACW and John’s French WW1 fleet – yes John, they are about the painting table now)).

I was thinking about a DBMM army. I really liked the pictures of the Khurasan Miniatures I had seen but he’s taken the website off-air for a few weeks. I was thinking Kushan, or Khurasanian or even something South American. I also considered increasing my Koguryo Koreans to DBMM size. The Alain Touller Figurines are really quite nice. Lastly I have been considering something South-East Asian – Javanese and the like.

I was also thinking about my Peru-Bolivia-Chile project in 10mm. That seems quite an attractive proposition at the moment although I would need to write some rules.

What I finally decided on is Aeronefs. I have ‘nefs and Aerostats to paint. I have 2mm terrain pieces to fly over. I have always wanted a train set and I know where I can get a 2mm train. As for terrain, some A4 size MDF sheets from Art Friend here are going to be just the business as a base to build terrain on.

Yep, decided. A continuation of the Peshawar project.

Aeronefs!

The Peruvian/Chilean Navy — The Models

DSC01478I started to put the models together, sort them by navy and prepare them for painting. It was a good opportunity to take care of some before photos. I was rushing to prepare for painting as well due in part to my wanting to undercoat some buildings I had just finished assembling. They were a test as one of them was my first experience with etched brass which now no longer holds the same degree of fear for me. Back to the ships.

The picture to the right is the Chilean fleet in 1/2400th scale from Tumbling Dice UK laid out in preparation for assembly. Most of the parts go together quiet well and only two or three episodes of finger sticking occurred, although with the residual super glue on my finger, the finger print lock is not going to recognise me in the morning Smile

I did make some simplifications when preparing the models, in particular to the Almirante Cochrane and Blanco Encalda, by dropping the sails altogether and having them steam up in battle trim. ((OK, so there were some issues adding the last batch of sails)) The two fleets are now outlined below.

The Peruvians

Type of Vessel

image
Huascar
Monitor, capable under steam of achieving a speed of 10 to 11 knots. Weight was 1,130 long tons. Armour plating was 4.5 inches thick and armament was 2×300-pound guns. The ship was built in 1865.

image
Independencia
Ironclad Frigate, capable under steam of achieving a speed of 12 to 13 knots. Weight was 2,004 long tons. Armour plating was 4.5 inches thick and armament was 2×150-pound guns. The ship was built in 1865.

image
Manco Capac
Monitor – ex USS Oneota a coastal monitor built at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Alexander Swift & Co., and by the Niles Works, was launched 21 May 1864.Alexander Swift and Co., illegally resold the Oneta to Peru along with her sister-ship Catawba violated a treaty the United States had signed with Spain. Though the sale was allowed to proceed Swift and Co. had to pay fines that equalled nearly ⅓ of the total sale amount.She was capable of a speed of 6 knots. Weight was 1,034 long tons. Armour plating was 10 inches thick and armament was 2×500-pound guns. The ship was built in 1864.Because she was built as a coastal vessel she was not very sea-worthy so remained protecting ports etc.

image
Atahulpa
Monitor – ex USS Catawba. She was capable of a speed of 6 knots. Weight was 1,034 long tons. Armour plating was 10 inches thick and armament was 2×500-pound guns. The ship was built in 1864.Because she was built as a coastal vessel she was not very sea-worthy so remained protecting ports etc.

image
Union
Screw corvette of 1,150 long tons capable of 13 knots and armed with 12×68-pound guns and 1×9-pound gun.

image
Pilcomayo
Screw gunboat of 600 long tons and capable of 10.5 knots. Armed with 2×70-pound guns and 4×40-pound guns.

At the moment, I am in Singapore and my Conway’s is in Australia so I am separated from my normal reference material. I shall look up more details of the vessels when I get back to Australia.

The Chileans

Details

image
Almirante Cochrane
Ironclad Frigate of 3,500 long tons capable of 9 t0 12.8 knots under steam. Armour was up to 9-inch and armament was 6×9-inch guns.

image
Blanco Encalda
Ironclad Frigate of 3,500 long tons capable of 9 t0 12.8 knots under steam. Armour was up to 9-inch and armament was 6×9-inch guns.

image
O’Higgins
Screw Corvette of 1,101 long tons capable of 12 knots. Armed with 3×115-pound guns, 2×70-pound guns and 2×12-pound guns.

image
Chacabuco
Screw Corvette of 1,101 long tons capable of 11 knots. Armed with 1×115-pound guns, 2×70-pound guns and 2×12-pound guns.

image
Abtao
Screw Corvette of 1,051 long tons capable of 8 knots. Armed with 3×115-pound guns, and 3×30-pound guns.

image
Esmerelda
Screw Corvette of 854 long tons capable of 8 knots. Armed with 16×32-pound guns and 2×12-pound guns.

image
Magallanes
Gunboat of 772 long tons capable of 11.5 knots. Armed with 1×115-pound gun, 1×64-pound gun and 2×20-pound guns.

image
Cavadonga
Schooner of 412 long tons capable of 7 knots. Armed with 2×70-pound guns and 2×40-pound guns.

I have had to cheat with some of the vessels as there are no specific models but at 1/2400th scale, this is not so noticeable. For example, for the Peruvian Manco Capac and Atahulpa I have had to use the USS monitor as that was the only single turret ACW monitor made by Tumbling Dice. The other monitor made was a twin turreted vessel. Similarly with the Chilean fleet, in particular Cavadonga which is a shade large and not with a brigantine sail set.

Undercoating of these will occur later this week (waiting for the glue to dry at the moment). More details about these vessels to follow too.

The Peruvian/Chilean Navy

DSC01469So, as I mentioned, the postman called today at the office ((actually, he called today at the condo as well – more steel paper from Magnetic Displays for my storage boxes)). I mentioned on July 23rd in the post the War of the Pacific 1879 to 1883 Naval Matters that I was ordering some 1/2400th scale vessels from Tumbling Dice UK. That was 10 days ago from London to Singapore. Damned good service from them.

I ordered the following vessels:

Code Description
ASV61 Hauscar & Independencia
ASV62 Aimirante Cochrane
ASV15 Corvette Screw
ASV11 Sloop Screw
ASV13 Gun Boat Screw
ASV51 USS Monitor
  Los Andes
  Javery

The USS Monitor is to provide a couple of single turret monitors for the Peruvians and the Los Andes and Javery were just to see what’s in them.

I like the way these guys look. Even included on some of the models are ratlines. I am so looking forward to assembling and painting these little guys. My big worry is that I may end up shelving my 1/1000th (ish) scale vessels and replacing them with 1/2400th as well.

More on scale in the next post.

New Toys – The First South Americans

20120803-150748.jpg

The mailman knocked and a parcel arrived from the nice folks at Tumbling Dice in the UK. The Peruvian and Chilean Navies in 1/2400th scale for my little South American project. I’ll post more detail over the weekend as I get these little beauties home and have a chance to shuffle them around the coffee table making suitable nautical sounds.

The War of the Pacific – 1879 to 1883 – Naval Matters

So I was researching some ships last night to make up the fleets of what now is becoming my South American Project. I looked at some of the 1/1200th and 1/1000th available, Houston’s Ships again amongst others. However, I thought I’d go small as there is not so much space available here. I settled on getting some 1/2400th scale ships off Tumbling Dice UK. Twenty minutes on-line research at that wonderful mine of misinformation, Wikipedia, and I had enough information on the two fleets to spend another 20 minutes at the Tumbling Dice website. An order for the following has gone off:

Quantity Code Description No of Vessels Price
1 ASV61 Hauscar & Independencia 2 £2.00
1 ASV62 Aimirante Cochrane 2 £2.00
3 ASV15 Corvette Screw 6 £6.00
1 ASV11 Sloop Screw 2 £2.00
1 ASV13 Gun Boat Screw 3 £2.00
1 ASV51 USS Monitor 3 £2.00

The USS Monitor is to provide a couple of single turret monitors for the Peruvians. In fact, Peru had purchased two Canonicus-class monitors from the United States just after the American Civil War and these were used as coastal monitors. The Monitor is just going to have to serve the role as it was the only single turret monitor in the range.

Mind you, whilst I was in an ordering mood, I also ordered a pack of the Los Andes and a pack of the Javery, just to see what’s in them.