6mm Numidian/Moors for DBA — 215 BCE-696 CE

A Numidian DBA Army

These have been complete for a few years now but I thought that as I was showing off new 6mm armies, I should show off a few older ones as well. Today, it is the turn of the Numidians.

The Numidians/Moors are recorded from the time of the Punic Wars to just after the Heraclian Dynasty in the East and the start of the Twenty Years’ Anarchy in Byzantium.

The Numidians were renowned as the best light cavalry in the period around the Punic Wars and are one of the easiest armies to paint, consisting of a plain tunic of unbleached material, a plain hide shield (undecorated as near as I can find), flesh and hair. Job done, a true four colour paint job!

A Later Moorish force

The Numidians and Moors rode ponies, generally without bridles or saddles controlling their ponies with their knees. They were usually light troops and performed excellent service for both the Carthaginians and the Romans.

These make a great army for a campaign set as they were both allies and enemies to the Carthaginians as well as to the Romans. If I grab a few more I can even manage the civil war between Jugurtha and Adherbal in 112 BCE.

The figures are from Baccus 6mm Miniatures. I finished painting these back in 2011 when living in Singapore (goodness, has it been that long?). They are part of a set known in Thomo’s Hole as the Singapore Project. The army was constructed for the previous version of the DBA rules as are the rest of that set. DBA Version 3 was released in 2014.


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6mm Anglo-Saxons for DBA — 701-1016 CE

The DBA Anglo-Saxons with one option fully laid out.

I finally finished these over the last couple of days, the Anglo-Saxons for DBA as part of the Bloodaxe Project. The post that took the original idea and then set it all in motion is the Dark Age Campaign Set – the Figures needed and Dark Age Campaign Set – the Figures ordered. Noticing how long ago it was I purchased the figures, it has been a year to get one of the six armies complete. If I keep at the same rate, I will have it all finished by Christmas 2026.

The rules and the Army blocked up for the “press shot” 🙂

These troops represent the Anglo-Saxons from about 701 CE onward, about the time the Anglo-Saxons adopted shield wall tactics in battle until the time of Knut.

The army as painted covers the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Wessex, Mercia, East Anglia and Northumbria as well as some minor states.

These kingdoms were the ones that bore brunt of the Viking invasions and later struggle for control of England.

For those looking for the inspiration for this period, there are many books, both fiction and non-fiction around the period as well as coverage with fictional and semi-fictional TV series coming to mind. The Last Kingdom, set in the time of Alfred’s England and the Vikings, set just a little earlier are two that come to mind.

In wargame terms and for the DBA wargame rules, the army is III/24b Anglo-Saxon Army 701-1016 AD. The army as painted can also be used (morphed) into the Anglo-Saxons of 617 to 700 CE, when the infantry behaved more like warbands.


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Damned Historical Fiction – Sub-Roman British and Arthur!

I knew it would happen. I was reading David Pilling’s Ambrosius for my midnight read with a glass of Dr. Feelgood before retiring for the evening. I thought I could control the urges but the addiction was too strong.

We’ve been in Enhanced Community Quarantine here not for 37 days with at least 9 more days to go, but also with many rumours that the government will extend for an additional two to four weeks.

So in those evening hours, after a glass and a read and just before drifting off to sleep, one’s mind turns to thinking about … Sub-Roman British.

I’m thinking, “it can’t be too hard and won’t require many figures, after all I have a fair spares box from the Vikings in 6mm – the Project Start project which interestingly is a project I started one year ago, then got distracted with some ships.

So, I thought that I could use the the left-over Ostrogoths from that project and use them as your fairly generic hairy barbarian types. That project also provides some barbarian cavalry and archers as well. Once the post returns to normal I would just need to get a few Late Roman types for some of the cavalry and the more Roman looking infantry. Of course that purchase would need to wait until post is flowing freely in the Philippines again and Baccus 6mm recommences moulding. The Anglo-Saxons for the Viking project can be re-purposed. In the Sub-Roman Britain time they were all basically dense warband in wargaming terms. In the Viking times, they had become a little more organised and had a few warband but must were densely packed spears. Voila, instant transformation.

And I was going to eave it there, honest guv’nor, I was.

I started to read book 2 off Pilling’s Leader of Battles Series and started to think back to the Sub-Roman British of Ambrosius’s time. The same army would do for Ambrosius or Artorius, however, why not reproduce Vortigern’s army as well?

And if I cam going to do Vortigern’s, perhaps I should consider the hairy Scots, the Irish, Welsh and Picts of the time. Yes six armies would make a lovely campaign set again, with Ambrosius and Vortigern sometimes combining to see off the Scots and Irish, at other times facing each other across the field of battle.

So, another project to plan and an excuse to rifle through the leftover boxes on the weekend to see what I really need to purchase later to complete this set.

What is worrying is that there are three more books in the Leader of Battles series following. Still, I am resisting the urge for Artorius to travel to Gaul and assist against the Visigoths … I would need more figures for that and as a responsible wargamer I could not consider doing that … yet!