In the Mail 02 – more 1/3000 scale ships arrive

I received a parcel from Hobby Link Japan this past week. See what it contains.

I will look in more detail at the contents in another few days.

Russo-Japanese War Fleets – 1/3000 Navwar

Nineteen years ago I purchased the Navwar Battle of Tsushima pack. Back then if I recall correctly it cost about £19.00 or £25.00 £39.95*. Now, pack 3CBP04 costs £55.00. The pack itself contains all the major vessels from the Battle of Tsushima, Japanese and Russian sides, in 1/3000 scale. I added some extra vessels around the time as well to be able to reproduce most of the vessels involved in that conflict.

At the time I put this set together I did not have much in the way of painting information so painted the Russian fleets in basically the “Victorian Livery” of black hulls, white superstructures and ochre funnels. The Japanese vessels larger than a TBD were painted in a tropical white livery. Over time access to better research and information as well as some nice contemporary prints from Japan suggested that pretty much everything was in the wrong colour. Oh well, my excuse is that at the time I was a wargamer first and whilst an avid reader, my knowledge of nautical matters was limited – but I was learning.

So, I learnt that the Japanese vessels were in grey, and given that later in the 20th century each of the arsenals in Japan used a different shade of grey, I figured at least that the shade of grey was not that important for this project. I started to repaint them.

The Japanese TDBs and torpedo boats were in black. Everything was coal fired at this stage.

On the Russian side, as I mentioned above, everything had been painted in the Victorian Livery. Repaint started there as well. The Black Sea Baltic Fleet, “the Fleet that had to Die,” had very little needing to be done as they were in a Victoria Livery it seems. The Vladivostok and Port Arthur vessels were another matter however. The Vladivostok fleet was reported in some reading I did to be in a dark green colour, presumably to make it harder to discern the vessels against a green landscape. I had the impression that it was a Brunswick green but I may be misremembered the reading of 15 years ago and mixing them up with the pre-World War 1 Austrians. However, I opted for a slightly lighter shade.

The Port Arthur fleet was reported in some reading I did as having been repainted in a cinnamon colour. This is a darker brown and I guess it was to make the vessels harder to discern against the dusty hills behind Port Arthur. The brown shade may also have come from a shortage of paint in the correct shade so that when the paints available in Port Arthur were all mixed together to be able to maintain he vessels tied up there, a brown shade may have resulted. I opted for a lighter shade which I am not happy with and may repaint again when motivation strikes.

Lastly, at this stage of my naval wargaming career, I was taking a quick and easy route to basing. I picked up some Hammered Metal, Coral Blue from the hardware store. The Hammered metal ranges of paint are designed to look like old style metal filing cabinets. When painted on a flat surface they provided a sea effect. On the vessels I have repainted, I added a wake from the vessels to it is easy to see what has been redone and what is still in the original colours I painted in. That Hammered Metal when painted on a flat surface such as a 6’x4′ pieve of particle board. provides a very suitable sea surface.

The only other work I did on these vessels was to add a brass wire mast or masts where appropriate. Photos below.

*Note re pricing. How hazy the grey matter gets over time. It was £39.95 at the time, not the £25.00 I later remembered – although I am now thinking that the Matapan set may have been around 25 quid. I looked back to the original post about the RJW ships from Navwar from about 10 years or so ago and had the price recorded there. In any case, it is a good purchase!

Fujimi/Navwar 1/3000 Naval Vessels – Ready for Paint

I have been working a little on two of the Fujimi ships as well as the equivalent Navwar vessels, getting them ready for paint in between bouts of coughing, sneezing, sleeping and putting up with a nose running like Usain Bolt. The Fujimi vessels came from Hobby Link Japan. The metal vessels are Navwar. The vessels are the carrier Shōkaku and the battleship Yamato. They have been attached to bases and the start of a sea surface added. I will get around to painting later this week or early next week.

Fujimi 1/3000 Naval Vessels

A friend here (hi Servillano) put me on to Fujimi’s 1/3000 ships. Now, having a sizeable collection of Navwar 1/3000 vessels plus some from War Times Journal, I was curious to see how Fujimi’s efforts stacked up. Now up front I will admit the GHQ’s 1/2400 vessels are the crème de la crème of model  vessels around this scale however Navwar provide, in my opinion, a better value for money being considerably less expensive than GHQ.

Fujimi adds another dimension. For a coupe of thousand Yen, I could pick up the 5th Carrier Division consisting of the carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku as well as 6 destroyers. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves:

I will of course display both again after painting but clearly the plastic from Fujimi has greater detail. It also has  deck decals to add later 😁

Lastly, I also picked up a second box that contained a Yamoto. Unassembled, the Navwar and the Fujjimi Yamoto’s, side by side:

The vessels are from Fujimi but I picked up mine from Hobby Link Japan.

January 2018 Summary – Work in Progress

The soon to be Polish Army circa 1975

It has been a mixed month. A longer than planned enforced stay in Australia waiting for the alignment of the juggernauts that are the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Australia Post, to return a new passport to me has meant that I have only spent a few days working on my hobbies. So, what have I achieved this month so far?

Last year I had ordered some Poles to provide an opponent for my Cold War Commander Danes, so started work on those in January, getting them ready for some paint (that is the army off to the right there).

Of course, feeling bored, I was glancing through an Heroics and Ros catalogue and decided that I should upgrade the armour in both armies so an order went off to Heroics and Ros for 12 Leopard 1 tanks for the Danes and 12 T-72M tanks for the Poles. I’m a wargamer, I plead guilty to being addicted to buying more figures. I expect the reinforcements to arrive any week now.

The Type 74

I also ordered some more ships early in January while sitting in Oz at mum’s waiting for the passport to arrive. In the fleet order are some World War 1 Russian vessels, a Soviet modern fleet and XXXXXX <– OK,  so I can’t remember the third fleet.

I also have the JGSDF type 74 tank (1/72 scale model) sitting on my work bench. I have started to work on that as well.

Lastly, in January, I managed to finish reading a few books and had them up for review here. So, not a bad effort overall. February target is less beer, lose weight, more hobby!

Wargamer’s Dilemma

The Son to be Polish Army circa 1975

I had purchased some figures from Ros and Heroics to make up a Polish Army circa 1975 to use with the Cold War Commander wargame rules.

Can you spot the error?

I ordered artillery but neglected to order artillery crews.

While I was not planning on buying figures this year except, for the few ships I bought for my Christmas present, I had to purchase artillery crew.

Well it would be rude to just order artillery crew so I decided to do what any self-respecting western government do, and that is to upgrade my armed forces.

I ordered my artillery crew and then ordered some T-72M to upgrade the Poles from 1970 to 1990 standards.

The Danes circa 1975 – with the odd bit of painting to still to do

Of course this would mean that the Danes (pictured on the left) needed to have some additional firepower as well to have a chance against the Poles. I therefore ordered 12 Leopard 1s to even things up again.

I can now bring both armies up to 1990 standards from about circa 1970.

The T-54s line up against a single Centurion

This is now the first painting project for 2018 – to finished both armies.

I am looking forward to this painting, but the first steps for the Poles will be to get them on bases, then add some sand to the bases. undercoat, probably in dark brown, then crack on with the painting.

Of course, a wargamer does not need an excuse to purchase more figures, I mentioned I have an order for some ships on the way to Manila from Navwar. It occurs to me as well that the ZSU-57-2 was replaced in Polish service with the ZSU-23-4 “Shilka” in this period so there will need to be an additional order soon.

The Wargamer’s Dilemma – buying more lead means painting more lead and researching more troop types which leads to buying more lead!

A New Project – The Lobster War

A number of posts have been floating around the Internet recently about a game called Cod Wars, set in the period of the Royal Navy’s losses to the plucky Icelanders. The game was developed by David Manley, run at Salute this year and there is a write up on his blog, Don’t Throw Bloody Spears at Me! This had me reading about the Cod Wars. The Cod Wars led on to the Turbot Troubles of Newfoundland (and I learned a lot about Newfoundland’s political history at the same time). All this then naturally enough led to the Lobster War.

Briefly, [from Wikipedia] the Lobster War (also known as Lobster Operation) is a name given to a dispute over spiny lobsters which occurred from 1961 to 1963 between Brazil and France. The Brazilian government refused to allow French fishing vessels to catch spiny lobsters 100 miles off the Brazilian northeast coast, arguing that lobsters “crawl along the continental shelf”, while the French sustained that “lobsters swim” and that therefore, they might be caught by any fishing vessel from any country. The dispute was resolved unilaterally by Brazil, which extended its territorial waters to a 200-mile zone, taking in the disputed lobsters’ bed.

There was, however, two fleets mobilised and involved and it could have got nasty. Best reason yet for this as a project however is the chance to use some 1960s naval technology and by 1960s I mean anything from about 1942 onward. The competing fleets were the Brazilian and French Fleets. The Brazillians utilised:

  • Ipiranga (V17) – a corvette
  • Paraná (D29) – a Fletcher class destroyer
  • Babitonga Pará (D-27) – a Fletcher class destroyer
  • Acre (D 10) – a destroyer
  • Araguari (D-15) – a destroyer
  • Greenhalgh (D 24) – a destroyer
  • Almirante Barroso (C-11) – a cruiser
  • Tamandaré (C-12) – a cruiser
  • Minas Gerais – an aircraft carrier
  • Riachuelo (S15) – submarine
  • 1 Squadron of B-17 maritime patrol aircraft
  • 1 Squadron of P-15
  • 4 x P-16 Tracker

Arrayed against this formidable force were the French forces offshore Brazil and the west coast of Africa:

  • Offshore Brazil:
    • Tartu (D636) – escort vessel (I guess like a frigate)
    • Paul Goffeny – despatch boat
  • Offshore West Africa:
    • Clemenceau – aircraft carrier
    • De Grasse – cruiser
    • Cassard (D623) – escort vessel
    • Jauréguiberry – escort vessel The Picard – destroyer
    • Le Gascon – destroyer
    • L’Agenais – destroyer
    • Le Béarnais – destroyer
    • Le Vendéen – destroyer
    • La Baise A625 – tanker

What’s not to like about this – could make for some fun wargaming. Now to hunt up my Navwar catalogue!

WIP – The Jutland Project – Part 6 – British Grand Fleet – The Battle Cruiser Fleet – The Task

The Battle Cruiser fleet
The Battle Cruiser fleet

And this is the last of the vessels that need to be painted. The battle cruisers and their supporting vessels.

Many of the destroyers for this fleet are photographed with the Grand Fleet so the painting load here does not look as large as it may have done.

Next off – getting the labels and bases prepared.

 

WIP – The Jutland Project – Part 5 – British Grand Fleet – The Battle Fleet – The Task

The Grand Fleet - the Battle Fleet. I'd count the number of ships but that may scare me away from painting!
The Grand Fleet – the Battle Fleet. I’d count the number of ships but that may scare me away from painting!

I did warn back when I posted WIP – The Jutland Project – Part 4 – German High Seas Fleet – The Task that the painting task for the Germans was small compared to that of the British.

Today, therefore, I present the second part of the painting task – part of the British fleet! This is main battle fleet and contains the battleships as well as supporting armoured cruisers, light cruisers and destroyers, lots of destroyers.

There are more vessels shown here than is needed for the Grand Fleet but that is because many of the destroyers that will be used by the Battle Cruiser Fleet are contained in packets used for Grand Fleet vessels. It will work out over time as I base them and get them all ready for painting.

Here I have even more basing, raising masts, making sea surfaces and painting do to.

Still, the Battle Cruiser Fleet is mercifully small by comparison. We’ll have a look at that tomorrow.

WIP – The Jutland Project – Part 4 – German High Seas Fleet – The Task

If you think there is some painting to do in there, wait until I get then British sorted out!
If you think there is some painting to do in there, wait until I get then British sorted out!

After working out the Order of Battle, I thought I would have a look at the painting job to do, in particular, the models for each of the fleets. Some sorting was in order and the results of that are shown in the image.

This is just the German Fleet and it pretty much follows the order of the OOB – battleships across then top row with their supporting light cruisers and torpedo boats falling into the second row. The battle cruisers are in the second row to the right with their supporting light cruisers and torpedo boats.

OK, it looks like I have a fair bit of basing, raising mast, making sea surfaces and painting do to.

Next up, I’ll sort the British fleet.