Armies of the Seven Years War

The postman brought another book. This time it was Digby Smith’s Armies of the Seven Years War: Commanders, Equipment, Uniforms and Strategies of the ‘First World War’, ISBN 978-075245-923-3.

I have been looking forward to this one as well. Smith’s Uniform works are quite good and I have an interested in the Seven Years War that remains unsatisfied still – both at a naval level and a battle level.

In fact, I have been pondering this war for the start of my own Imagi-Nations of that period, sort of like the Grand Duchy of Stollen. If not the Seven Years War period, then the Great Northern War or the War of Spanish Succession.

I digress.

Smith’s work is supposed to supply information on the senior commanders, uniforms, weapons, equipment, artillery, strategy, tactics and combat involvement (military and naval) of the forces engaged from 1756 to 1763.

States covered include Austria, Bavaria, Britain, Brunswick, Denmark, Hanover, Hessen-Darmstadt, Hessen-Kassel, Holland, France, the Palatinate, Portugal, Prussia, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Wurttemberg and the Holy Roman Empire. He has attempted to cover the uniforms of the protagonists and given that some of them had large forces, I am not sure that he will be able to manage that in a work this size. I am ready to be pleasantly surprised however.

There are over 150 illustrations and maps in this work. I will write more about this when I have had a chance to have a long look.

Triumph of Nations

9781849089289 I am falling for the quality of Field of Glory Napoleonic. Te rules seem OK, and I guess will give me as much pleasure as Shako does. With some clever basing I can use the figures for either game as well.

The other day, I was trawling through Amazon as I have a want to do from time to time and noticed that it was almost release date for Triumph of Nations so I ordered it. It appeared on my desk today.

I quite like this too – well presented lists covering the later period of the Napoleonic Wars, including some of the smaller nations.

Now all I need to do is to keep focussed on everything else and not start buying 15mm Napoleonic figures – no …. resist!!!!!

Vinh Long

vinh long 100 Jim at the War Times Journal has released some more models of ships from around the end of the 19th Century. This latest release includes:

  • Collingwood
  • Monmouth
  • Drake
  • Highflyer
  • Dupleix
  • Vinh Long
  • Wittelsbach
  • Braunschweig
  • Cormoran
  • Arcona
  • Umbria
  • Etna

Along with two shore batteries.

The Vinh-Long particularly interested me as I recalled reading somewhere about the USS Bainbridge (DD-246) having rescued a large number of passengers and crew from the vessel in the 1920s and the skipper of the Bainbridge being decorated for his efforts. A little research was therefore in order.

Off to the US Naval History and Heritage website – one of my favourite sites, especially for US Navy vessels history.

vinh long 105 The Vinh-Long was a 5500-ton screw steamship and was built in 1881. I was one of several military transports needed to support France’s colonial empire. During the First World War the Vinh-Long server as a hospital ship. After the November 1918 Armistice she returned to her previous role as a troops transport.

On 16 November 1922, while carrying 495 persons, including civilians as well as military and naval personnel, the Vinh-Long caught fire in the Sea of Marmora, Turkey. She was carrying armaments in her magazines and as the fire spread, eventually it reached her after magazines causing explosions. This caused the fire to intensify and spread throughout the rest of the ship.

Even though the blaze as intense and there were known risks of further explosions (the forward magazines for example. The USS Bainbrdge (DD-246) pulled alongside the bow of the Vinh-Long and managed to save 482 of the passengers and crew. Thirteen people, among them two women and four children, lost their lives in the fire and subsequent efforts to abandon ship, some having life boats fall on them when they were in the water. One other man died of exposure on board the Bainbridge.

vinh long 106 The Bainbridge was approached eventually by HMS Sepoy but by that time the Bainbridge was underway to Istanbul with the survivors so needed no further assistance.

The rescue of Vinh-Long‘s passengers and crew was widely celebrated at the time. The Bainbridge‘s officers and crew were officially commended for their performance and the captain of the Bainbridge, Lieutenant Commander Edwards, was subsequently honoured with the United States’ Medal of Honor along with the French Legion of Honor and the British Distinguished Service Order.

Following on from here are pictures of Lt Commander Edwards receiving his medal from the US President, Calvin Collidge and then the last three photos are of Edwards’ actually report of the incident.

I can see I will need to prepare and order for Jim shortly.

vinh long 110

vinh long 200

vinh long 201

vinh long 202

Opio en Provence

P1010200 I’m fortunate in having to have to spend a few days in Opio in the Alpes-Maritimes in the South of France. I’m attending a senior consultant conference from my company and this is held in the Club Med at Opio. Opio is a small town, about 361 metres above sea level with a population of a little over 2,000 people.

The last few days have been involved in some work activity, catching uo with some old friends and making some new ones, all whilst enjoying fine French cooking and produce.

I’m already looking forward to the next event in two years time.

1859-1871

I got a new book the other day. It was one that I had on a wish list for a while now. It was a history of the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 – The Austro-Prussian War – Austria’s War with Prussia and Italy in 1866 written by Geoffrey Wawro. Being the kind of wargamer I am, the first reason I liked the idea of wargaming that war was that it really was misnamed. The war actually involved Austria, Prussia and Italy, with the Prussians and the Italians taking on the Austrians with varying degrees of success.

I then got to thinking, Doug has been nagging at me to do some Franco-Prussian War figures so that we can play that with Polemos but i have been manfully resisting. Now, Italians and Austrians, there is an interesting pair, and he can use his Prussians.

I know he also bought some French for the FPW which made me think, “French v Italians? No. Ah, French and Italians v Austrians!”

I recalled that in 1859 there was a little war between those three protagonists and as I plan on gaming this in 6mm, the uniform detail should work for both 1859 and 1866 Italians and Austrians. I need to research the French Uniforms a little to decide whether the 6mm Franco-Prussian War French will work or whether I need to look at collecting some Crimean War French.

Voila, my next project to add to the growing pile of half and incomplete projects. Ah, wargames heaven.