Lunchtime Love

Yep … it’s love when you just finish your sandwich and the receptionist brings you a nice box with the rest of your World War 2 Blitzkrieg Commander Japanese. I had already received armour and infantry from GHQ and Heroics and Ros. I was waiting on some more armour from CinC. It arrived today. I now have enough to do my Japanese World War 2 army in 1/300¦1/285 scale – a perfect opponent for the Soviets in the early stages of the war. I will detail all of it up later but below are the shots of lunchtime love.

I should add that as far as cost and detail goes, you get what you pay for. With the vehicles, GHQ is is most expensive, CinC the second most expensive and Heroics & Ros the cheapest. The detail follows the same order. With the actual infantry figures, to be honest, I prefer the Heroics & Ros figures over the others. Adler also make World War 2 infantry in 6mm but alas, no Japanese.

Looking at the size of these vehicles I think I will need to base then on half size bases to the ones I am using for the Soviets as these tanks are very small – reminding me of how small it was inside my first Nissan many years ago.

More in this later … in the meantime, back to playing with the new toys!

USAAF Spitfires in World War 2

In one of those usual oddities of Google and the Internet, I was hunting for some information the other day on Soviet World War 2 aircraft camouflage and, as you do at a time like that, came across a reference to the USAAF flying Spitfires in World War 2. “Tally ho”, I thought,  “here’s an oddity to look further into”.

Look into it I did.

Well, not only did the USAAF flying some Spitfires but the US Navy also managed one squadron. There were four groups in the USAAF flying Spitfires for a time, initially out of England and then in the Mediterranean. They were:

United States Army Air Forces

4th Fighter Group

  • 334th Fighter Squadron
  • 335th Fighter Squadron
  • 336th Fighter Squadron

7th Photographic Reconnaissance Group

  • 13th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron
  • 14th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

31st Fighter Group

  • 2d Fighter Squadron
  • 4th Fighter Squadron
  • 5th Fighter Squadron

52d Fighter Group

  • 307th Fighter Squadron
  • 308th Fighter Squadron
  • 309th Fighter Squadron

United States Navy

Supermarine_Spitfire_Mk.Vc_USAAFI’ll freely admit that this was news to me. I had always associated the USAAF pursuit (fighter) groups with P-40s, P-47s, P-38s and P-51s, never with the Spitfire.

The 4th Fighter Group was fairly typical, It was constituted and activated in 1942, Activation was in England and the core of the Fighter Group were formers members of the RAF Eagle Squadrons. They commenced operations with Spitfires but moved across to P-47s in March of 1943 and P-51s in April 1944. 

Of course, the US Army Air Force was not the only non-Commonwealth country operating Spitfires in World War 2. I mentioned 1942 above. In 1942 Spitfires were being sent to the Soviet Union to assist that war effort. I can see I will need to add some to my Soviet mid World War 2 army. The picture below is of a line of Spitfires, camouflaged and marked with a red star ready for export to the Soviet Union.

USSR_Vb_1942