A Self Indulgence – the Wargaming Tasks for 2017

Last weekend I had the time to indulge myself in my fantasy – the painting queue for 2017. I had originally thought it was not that extensive as I had not purchased all that much in the way of new lead in 2016 and besides, I did not have too much left over for painting from 2014 and 2015.

The painting queue follows in not particular order!

World War II Aerial Combat. The aircraft mix in these packets are from Raiden Miniatures and are in 1/285th scale. They are:

  • Russian
    • 6 x Tupolev SB-3
    • 6 x I-16 ‘Rata’
  • Finnish
    • 4 x Fiat G.50
    • 4 x Fokker D.XXI
    • 4 x Brewster Buffalo

Russian/Finnish WW2 Aircraft
The rules are Raiden Miniatures Fast Play Aerial Combat Rules. I have version 1.1.

Any of the World War II aerial combat rules could be used. The beauty with the Winter War is that a mix of aircraft seldom seen on the wargames table is possible with the Finns using equipment from Italy, the Netherlands and the USA, among others.

Raiden also make a US WW2 aircraft carrier flight deck, the USS Enterprise, for flight and combat operations. It is a kit in 51 parts and I am not sure if it is made or not currently. See http://www.raidenminiatures.co.uk/4.html for details.

Thunderbolt and Lightning Air Combat Rules
Thunderbolt and Lightning Air Combat Rules
Starmada vessels from Brigade Models. In this case, the PacFed fleet. I have a PacFed Future War Commander Army tucked away up here and this is the off-planet version of those. The PacFed are loosely based around a “Pacific Federation” and contain a lot of vessels with Australian type names.

PacFed Starship Fleet
PacFed Starship Fleet
As an opponent to the PacFed I looked to ONESS – loosely based around German forces. Somewhere at mum’s I have the ground fleet to complement this. This also is from Brigade Models.

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The ONESS Starmada Fleet
Baccus 6mm figures make up the rest of my Singapore DBA Project. Armies still to be painted are:

  • II/9a Syracusan in Sicily 410-210BC
  • II/8 Campanian, Apulian, Lucanian and Bruttian 420-203BC
  • 11/39a Iberian 240-20BC
  • II/11 Gallic 400-50BC
  • II/32a Later Carthaginian 275-202BC

The 6mm Ancients
The 6mm Ancients
Speaking of Brigade Models, I acquired a US Aeronef fleet. This was for part of the Peshawar project but with the purchase of Imperial Skies, the project has expanded somewhat (see below for how much). Of course what is illustrated and discussed here does not mention the British, French and Prussian Aeronefs that are already in the collection.

These then are the US Aeronef fleet. Quite a tidy force. I have been trying to think of an alternative paint scheme other that the Great White Fleet colours of, well, white!

US Aeronefs
US Aeronefs
The perfect opponent for the Americans above – the forces of the Rising Sun. Both Fleets (the US and Japanese) are substantial and would be the two most powerful fleets in the collection.

As with the Americans I am trying to think of a colour scheme that is not the Japanese naval vessels at Tsushima!

Japanese Aeronefs
Japanese Aeronefs
I wanted a bit of fun so I added a Scandinavian Union fleet. Dumpy vessels certainly but they have a certain attraction as well. These are also from Brigade Models and I am pondering colour schemes for them.

These were never envisaged for the Peshawar Project however they will make a good opponent for the BENELUX forces described below.

Scandinavian Union
Scandinavian Union
For a little South American Aeronef action I picked up some Argentinians. These look sufficiently different to other ‘nefs to keep the interest up.

Rather than a standard grey or Victorian Livery for these I have been toying with the idea of basing a paint scheme around light blue and white – same colour as the shirts of the Pumas. Again, Brigade Models.

Argentinian Aeronefs
Argentinian Aeronefs
And if the Argentinians are light blue and white then the Brazilians should be both hairless and based around green and gold colours. I have an idea for that with an antique style of gold colouring.

Brazilian Aeronefs
Brazilian Aeronefs
An opponent for the Scandinavian Union, and possibly the Italians. The Benelux Aeronef fleet consists of vessels from Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Benelux Aeronefs
Benelux Aeronefs
The above-mentioned Italian Aeronefs.

Italian Aeronefs
Italian Aeronefs
The last of the Aeronefs in this years paint queue, the Russians. They are also one of the protagonists in the Peshawar campaign. For colours on these I am thinking, maybe, something like Port Arthur 1905.

Russian Aeronefs
Russian Aeronefs
A couple of years ago I picked up two armies for the Great Pacific War. Here are the Chilean/Peruvian Army and the Bolivian forces. I am planning on using these with the 1859, 1866 or 1870 rules. A project that has been on the back-burner for three years now.

10mm Chilean/Peruvian and Bolivian forces
10mm Chilean/Peruvian and Bolivian forces
I have had an interest in both the English Civil War and the 30 Years War for many years and picking up Baccus 6mm‘s English Civil War boxed set seemed like a good way of getting into it. The set gives me two armies, a couple of houses, Polemos rules and 60mm bases.

I am planning on using these with the Baroque Rules from Dadi and Piombo as well.

ECW - Polemos and Baroque
ECW – Polemos and Baroque
Navwar 1/3000 scale World War I Austrian ships – battleships to destroyers/torpedo boats. I have their main opponent, the Italian fleet, painted and here already. It must be said that during the war, both the Italian Royal Navy and the Austro-Hungarian Navy kept their most modern capital ships inside their bases (Pola and Kotor for the Austrian Fleet, Brindisi and Taranto for the Italian fleet), leaving mostly submarines, destroyers, torpedo boats and scout cruisers to do any fighting.

World War 1 Austrian Fleet
World War 1 Austrian Fleet
Heroics and Ros figures have been used for my Cold War Poles – an opponent for my Cold War Danes.

Cold War Commander Poles
Cold War Commander Poles

In addition to all that, there are a few other items on the list including:

  • Anthony’s 20mm World War II British
  • Finish off the 1/285 scale World War II Japanese
  • 1/285 scale World War II Hungarians
  • 1/300 scale Cold War Commander Danes to be completed
  • 1/1200 scale Coastal Warfare Ships
  • The 1/3000 scale Jutland Fleets
  • Houston Ships Italians and Austrians from the Battle of Lissa
  • Dystopian Wars fleets, and
  • Peshawar, 2mm ground forces

So – a painting queue that for 2017 should keep me busy well into 2020!

23 April 2017 – Update: Nothing. Nada. Not done a thing! Maybe I need to motivate myself and buy some more figures.

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Catching Google Out

googleIt’s always nice to catch out an icon like Google and yesterday I did. It was, of course, the 20th day of March, which means that it is around Equinox (spring equinox in the northern hemisphere, autumn equinox in the southern hemisphere). Google’s Australian home page appeared as the image to the left. It was very pretty and the mouse rollover hint on the picture indicated that it was the “First Day of Autumn – Design by Eric Carle”.

The only problem with this is that in Australia, the first day of Autumn traditionally is taken to be the 1st of March. For the record, winter in Australia starts on 1 June each year, spring on 1 September and summer, logically, on 1 December.

Oops 🙂

Mongolian Ice

Mongolian Ice - Click to see it larger
The non-slippery(ish) ice

I spent three years living in Norway. It snows in Norway. It gets cold in Norway. The sun shines in Norway. The result of these event in Norway is ice. Ice on the ground. Nasty, slippery (and sometimes wet) ice. I have the bruises and scars still from the ice of the three years I spent in Norway.It’s cold in Mongolia too. Actually, that statement kind of hides the truth. It is really, really cold in Mongolia. And sometimes there is snow, and sometimes there is sun. The result of this is also ice. The difference is that here it is so cold that even the ice freezes.

The nice thing about Mongolian ice is that because it is so cold here, the ice is not as slippery as Norwegian ice. So far this winter I have managed to not slip over (touch wood and whistle).

So You Think It Is Cold

Ice on the inside of my window - Click to see it larger
Ice in the INSIDE of Thomo's window

The photo at attached to this entry is from my living room — well, at least the dining area anyway. And yes, that ice, and yes, that is on the inside of the window. Even with double glazing and with the windows being repaired at the start of winter, the glass temperature itself is well below freezing. The result is this, ice on the inside of the window.

A Cool Night for a Beer

Dave and Oyuna at the Bar
Dave and Oyuna at the Ice Bar

Saturday night in Ulaanbaatar. I had just returned from Nukht, about 20 minutes drive out of town, where the bank had held a planning session. About 7:30 I found myself with nothing much to do except watch TV and watch the washing dry so thought I would head over to Dave’s Place for a bite to eat and a pint of “X”. I hadn’t been there for a while so thought it would be good to catch up on a few things  – like what had been happening for the last three months.

So, enter Thomo, from a -36 degree evening outside. I had walked to the pub and heaven’s it was cold. Entered, undid coat and Dave says “we are just going out, come with us”. Thomo does up coat again and we headed out into the cold again to the other side of the Railway line and a party around an Ice Bar. The party was hosted by some of the guys from Ivanhoe Mines. There were two half gers ((small sized gers)) there, as well as a number of 44 gallon drums burning wood. Food was inside.

Thomo after walking home
Thomo after his stupidly walking home - the red is real as is the ice!

Naturally we stood outside, fully rugged up, drinking beer and freezing (but all being too tough to be the first to go back inside). Remember, it is -36 degrees celsius. The beer was kept chilled in a large insulated container with ice in it — the ice and the container designed to keep the beer chilled for drinking, but to prevent it freezing. No insulated beer can holders (stubby holders) needed here.

’twas a good party though, great food (which I believe was made by Joel of the UB Deli), top music and a great time. The photo above is Dave and Oyuna from Dave’s place standing by the Ice Bar. I could not take it any clearer on the phone camera as my hands were shaking too much from the cold.

When Your Snot Freezes

I’ve been away for a couple of weeks. Had a small medical problem that needed checking in Hong Kong – more on Hong Kong later.
Winter has settled into Mongolia now – last night it was -25 and whilst the apartment is toasty warm (actually, I am lucky, I am in a new apartment so can control, somewhat, the heat coming from the central heating), outside it is, well, a little chilly.

I had experienced cold weather before, living for three years in Norway (“morn, morn, ikke sant?”) and the Norwegians have a very sage saying, “there is no such thing as bad weather, simply bad clothing”. They use this as justification for being out and about in any weather. Many of you can recall the pictures on television of the Winter Olympics in Lillehammer a few years ago and the image that flashed around the world of a number of Norwegians, sat together in the snow with a fire, drinking coffee and picnicing in the sunshine whilst the temperature was -20.

I have sat outside in -20 temperatures in the sunshine with Norwegians drinking beer. However, I can feel that winter here is going to be a little different. Today, something that has never happened to me before happened to me. I walked outside on my way to do the shopping and ….

My snot froze in my nose.

A most unusual experience. I’ve had my breath freeze in my beard before (that happens around -12) but never have I had the snot in my nose freeze. Sort of makes the nose feel rather funny.

Of course, walking back from the supermarket and the delicatessen my shopping also froze in my shopping bags.

And this is only early December. Last January the temperature range here for one day was -37 to -30 … hmm, wonder what freezes at -37 – everything else on you is well frozen by then.

Seasonal Change

I noted it before when winter passed through into Spring, and then into Summer. These were overnight changes in Mongolia. Well, they seemed overnight at least. Here we are, sitting at the end of summer. Last weekend I wore shorts, this weekend I am wearing jeans and a flannelette shirt. Summer disappeared sometime in the last 15 days or so. Leaves will fall from trees soon (again, they will be there one day, gone the next).

Today is the 10th of September, it is overcast, very light rain from time to time. Temperature at night now is about 3 or 4 degrees Celsius. Daytime temperature between 10 and 18 Celsius. In 5 days time the central heating goes back on in Ulaanbaatar.

Hmm, grey days, short days, long nights and cold cold cold to come. I am looking forward to this first winter in Mongolia. I have some books on order and hopefully they will arrive this week as well as some more hobby stuff so I should be fine on the weekends and in the evenings. Then, if course, there is the internet — when surfing international sites it is slightly faster than snail mail – but just slightly.